View of Brighton, c1846

This print shows central Brighton in the 1840s. It captures the view from the Royal Albion Hotel, looking north.

Use the controls to zoom in and view details of the print. You can also download and re-use the image.

Below we’ve highlighted some landmarks you can examine in the picture.

What can we see?

Royal Pavilion

Detail of print showing Royal Pavilion

At this time, the Pavilion was still a royal palace, and Queen Victoria had last stayed here in 1845. As a royal residence the building needed to be under guard at all times, which is why we can see a sentry box outside the Pavilion.

Victoria’s 1845 stay would prove to be her last. She sold the Pavilion to the town in 1850.

Mrs Fitzherbert’s House

Detail of print showing Mrs Fitzherbert's house on the left.

The building on the left is known as Steine House. It was formerly the home of Maria Fitzherbert, the first (unlawful) wife of George IV.

The house was built especially for Fitzherbert in 1804. She lived here until her death in 1837, about ten years before this print was made.

George IV

Detail of print showing statue of George IV

This statue of George IV was commissioned by the people of Brighton to celebrate the king’s long association with the town. It was erected in 1828, just two years before George’s death.

In 1922 the statue was moved to its present position to the north of the Pavilion. This was to make way for the war memorial that now stands on this spot.

St Peter’s Church

Detail of print showing St Peter's Church

St Peter’s Church can be seen in the background. It would have been hard for visitors to Brighton to miss this church as it is situated at the fork in the roads that lead to London and Lewes.

Behind the church we can see the rolling Downs and a windmill. This is one of two windmills visible on the print.

Author: Tasha Brown, Visitor Services Officer


2 thoughts on “View of Brighton, c1846”

  1. Drawn in by the postcard of the Indian soldiers in the hospital beds, because of a project I’m doing about women’s mental health in WW1, I have loved being led to the other items from the museum. Thank you very much and please do more like this.

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